Autistics in Mental Health Crisis (second in a series)

Autistics in Crisis Part Two: Crisis Aversion or Resources We Need

But knowing all those things I talked about in part one would not have kept me out of their ERs (preventing the crises in the first place). Knowing all those things would not solve the systemic issues contributing to crises. There are a lot of reasons Autistic people have crises. Quality of care if accessed, past or current trauma, isolation, a lack of community mental health resources, and other systemic barriers – often alongside co-occurring mental health diagnoses – combine to put people in crisis mode.

Both access to and quality of mental health care are issues for Autistic people. Many of the Autistic people who do access mental health care have reported pressure to “treat” their autism, and other mistreatment by mental health professionals. Even among professionals who do not seek to “fix” autism, Autistics’ distinct and various methods of expressing emotion and language can leave unprepared professionals at a loss and Autistic patients frustrated. There are also other factors. Some have difficulty navigating the health care system and lack support. A large number of Autistics can’t afford care for any number of reasons.

One Autistic writer highlights many of the above systemic barriers in a piece on autism and suicide (suicide crises are not the only mental health crises that occur, but Autistic adults without intellectual disabilities are nine times more likely than non-autistics to die by suicide). The author also discusses unemployment along with barriers to autonomy and social connection as contributing factors to Autistics’ high suicide rates. Here are some of the solutions the author offers:

We can be attentive to people who seem isolated and intentionally include them. We can check up on people who are known to be struggling… We can make our community welcoming to newcomers who desperately need the shelter of Autistic space. We can spread the word about autism-friendly mental health services… We can advocate for policies that support independence, like employment first and walkable communities.

For me, it would have been really helpful to have a 24-hour drop-in center or peer respite center (an alternative program where people in crisis can stay, staffed by people who have experienced mental health needs) somewhere nearby. There weren’t other options for me to stay safe. One study has indicated that peer respite centers result in better outcomes (for a variety of mental health needs) than psychiatric inpatient treatment, and there is a growing evidence base for supporting peer respite centers. 

Another resource would be a mental health phone (and text-based as Autistics can have a hard time with phones) line geared for connecting a person with services or other peer support when they are not at a crisis point. They would get connected based on level of need and which care they wanted. It would have a diverse staff to help make sure people did not end up with people mistreating them if they have a certain identity. Some similar projects, though not quite with that scope, already exist. One project called Project Warmline – people who need someone to talk to can speak to someone who has mental health needs – is in Oregon and has received state funding. Some other warmlines are listed here. It is not inconceivable that these projects could expand. 

There are significant gaps in community-based mental health resources. There is also a failure to address systemic barriers for Autistic people and improve quality-of-life research and supports by the largest sources of autism-related funding. These factors create a complex push into crisis mode for many Autistics. We can push for policy changes and support one another as fellow Autistics.

. . .

This is the second in a series of posts.

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